Saturday, November 10, 2012

Abigail Keam - Death by Bourbon - Author Interview & Giveaway

Author Interview 

1. How did you come up with the title?
Since I am writing a murder mystery series, I wanted to brand it so it would be easy for the readers to remember. "Death By ______" is catchy and can be dramatically worked into graphics for the cover.

2. Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?
I want the reader to have a good time and immerse his/her self in a world that evokes a certain old-time style of glamour, manners and grace which still exists in Kentucky.

3. How much of the book is realistic?
I get reviews all the time that state my books are fun and a quick read. That's a great compliment to my style of writing for the books are packed full of information. Writing these books is like weaving a carpet. I spend a great deal of time weaving in history, beekeeping, clues for up-coming books, clues for the current story and little vignettes of stories that people have told me over the years.

When a person is finished reading a Josiah Reynolds mystery, I want to the reader to have a broad sense of not only what the Bluegrass looks like but its history and culture. I receive many emails from readers saying they have never been to Kentucky but they have a sense of what it looks like. Many readers also write to me explaining how they love to read what the characters eat. I try to keep all facets of Kentucky life real - down to the clothes and language.

So if the reader can absorb all this information and think it's fun to read, then I did my job well.

4. If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your book?
There is nothing I would change in the book but I would have hired two editors instead of one. The editor and I did not catch all the spelling errors in the first book. That cost me fans and bad reviews from the readership. If I had had two editors or a more knowledgeable editor, then the mistake percentage would have gone down and I would not have angered potential readers. It cost me a great deal of time and money to get those errors fixed plus looking for a new editor.

5. What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Having the guts to write it.

6. Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?
I learned that you better have a thick skin or you're not going to write the second book.

7. Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?
My 4th grade teacher gave me high mark on a story I wrote and told my mother that I should be encouraged to write. It was the first time I ever received positive attention from an adult. Usually I was being punished by an adult as I was very naughty. I still am.

8. Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?
There are some many wonderful writers both past and present. I would say that James M. Cain and Dashiell Hammett are the strongest influences on my mystery writing. I read them every year. They are the masters of crisp clean writing of mysteries.

9. Tell us your latest news.
I am working on the fifth Josiah Reynolds mystery "Death By Lotto" and hope to have it out early in 2013. "Death By Bourbon" was released in October and is doing very well. I am very pleased with its reception.

10. Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?
If you find a writer that you like, then do everything you can to support that writer. You can write good reviews for them on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Goodreads. You can tell your friends. You can hand out swag from the writer. Many writers struggle financially and if you want them to continue to write, then you and the public must support them.
In a country where half the population doesn't read a newspaper or any books, it is important that the public supports writers that do appeal and might increase readership in the general population. Look what the Harry Potter books did for increasing the readership in young people. Those books had a very positive effect on causing young people plus adults to read. And they were made popular by word of mouth from the earliest readers. We need more of that excitement from readers to spread the word about their favorite writers.

Readers. Thank you for taking the time to read this questionnaire. If you read my Josiah Reynolds series, I hope you find them enjoyable. I know I enjoyed writing them for you.


About the Book

Life takes a dramatic turn for Josiah when she witnesses a death at an engagement party for guess who . . . Matt. Matt? Yes Matt.



Charming socialite Addison DeWitt falls into a fit after taking a sip of bourbon. That would be upsetting enough but Josiah is sure it is murder. However, no one will believe her except for Lady Elsmere and Meriah Caldwell, the famous mystery writer. The three of them conspire to bring the murderer to justice. It turns out that the suspect is always three steps ahead of them.



To make matters worse, Josiah's daughter, Asa, decides to move to London, Franklin leaves town and Jake starts singing a different turn. Josiah doubts her ability to meet the future alone. Maybe it's time to sell the Butterfly and move to Florida with the rest of the old folks.


Prices/Formats: $15.00 paperback, $2.99 ebook
Pages: 196
Genre: Mystery
Publisher: Worker Bee Press
Release Date: September 1, 2012
Buy Links: Amazon, Kindle


About the Author

Abigail Keam is an award-winning author who writes the Josiah Reynolds mystery series about a beekeeper turned sleuth.

Death By A HoneyBee won the 2010 Gold Medal Award for Women’s Lit from Reader’s Favorite and was a Finalist of the USA BOOK NEWS-Best Books of 2011. Death By Drowning won the 2011 Gold Medal Award for Best Mystery Sleuth and also was placed on the USA BOOK NEWS-Best Books of 2011.

Ms. Keam is also an award-winning beekeeper who lives on the Kentucky River in a metal house with her husband and various critters.

Links to connect with Abigail:
Web site
Facebook
Twitter



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